Free marketing plan template for SMEs

Regardless of size or industry, every small business requires a marketing plan. A marketing plan should form part of your overall business plan and set up your business for long-term growth and success.

Small business marketing expert and director of consultancy Little Marketing, Michael Kava says a marketing plan allows for a more cohesive marketing messaging.

“A well-written marketing plan gives you a better chance of cutting through the marketing clutter and communicating effectively with your core audience, and new customers,” he says. 

Every business is different when it comes to the best marketing tools to utilise. While social media works well for one business, another might get better results from direct marketing, television or radio advertising, or a word of mouth campaign.

Knowing how much to spend can be tough. One rule of thumb suggests small business owners should spend ten per cent of their turnover on marketing, but sometimes competing interests make that difficult, Kava says.

“When first dipping your toe into the world of marketing, a small business that outsources all elements of its marketing could set of a budget of around $20,000 to $25,000 in its marketing plan,” he suggests. 

However, taking marketing design and implementation elements in-house will reduce those costs significantly.

Once you’ve written a 12-month marketing plan, make sure there’s room for ad hoc marketing activities as they arise throughout the year.

“Every business probably has five competitors who aren’t doing marketing, and if you are, then it will grow your brand and ultimately, your business,” Kava says.

“When it comes to marketing, you simply need to do more of what works, and less of what doesn’t.”

Regardless of size or industry, every small business requires a marketing plan. A marketing plan should form part of your overall business plan and set up your business for long-term growth and success.

Small business marketing expert and director of consultancy Little Marketing, Michael Kava says a marketing plan allows for a more cohesive marketing messaging.

“A well-written marketing plan gives you a better chance of cutting through the marketing clutter and communicating effectively with your core audience, and new customers,” he says.

Every business is different when it comes to the best marketing tools to utilise. While social media works well for one business, another might get better results from direct marketing, television or radio advertising, or a word of mouth campaign.

Knowing how much to spend can be tough. One rule of thumb suggests small business owners should spend ten per cent of their turnover on marketing, but sometimes competing interests make that difficult, Kava says.

“When first dipping your toe into the world of marketing, a small business that outsources all elements of its marketing could set of a budget of around $20,000 to $25,000 in its marketing plan,” he suggests.

However, taking marketing design and implementation elements in-house will reduce those costs significantly.

Once you’ve written a 12-month marketing plan, make sure there’s room for ad hoc marketing activities as they arise throughout the year.

“Every business probably has five competitors who aren’t doing marketing, and if you are, then it will grow your brand and ultimately, your business,” Kava says.

“When it comes to marketing, you simply need to do more of what works, and less of what doesn’t.”

Marketing Plan Template

Download our marketing template plan here

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